David Skeie

David Skeie

Senior Economist
Money and Payments Studies Function
Federal Reserve Bank of New York
33 Liberty Street
New York, NY 10045

Phone (212) 720-5635
Fax (212) 720-8363
david.skeie@ny.frb.org

Social Media

Crisis Chronicles: Not Worth a Continental—The Currency Crisis of 1779 and Today’s European Debt Crisis
With James Narron
Federal Reserve Bank of New York Liberty Street Economics Blog, April 2014

Crisis Chronicles: The Credit and Commercial Crisis of 1772
With James Narron
Federal Reserve Bank of New York Liberty Street Economics Blog, March 2014

Crisis Chronicles: The Commercial Credit Crisis of 1763 and Today’s Tri-Party Repo Market
With James Narron
Federal Reserve Bank of New York Liberty Street Economics Blog, February 2014

Crisis Chronicles: The Mississippi Bubble of 1720 and the European Debt Crisis
With James Narron
Federal Reserve Bank of New York Liberty Street Economics Blog, January 2014

Crisis Chronicles: The South Sea Bubble of 1720—Repackaging Debt and the Current Reach for Yield
With James Narron
Federal Reserve Bank of New York Liberty Street Economics Blog, November 2013

Crisis Chronicles: The "Not So Great” Re-Coinage of 1696
With James Narron
Federal Reserve Bank of New York Liberty Street Economics Blog, September 2013

Crisis Chronicles: Tulip Mania, 1633-37
With James Narron
Federal Reserve Bank of New York Liberty Street Economics Blog, September 2013

Crisis Chronicles: 300 Years of Financial Crises (1620–1920)
With James Narron
Federal Reserve Bank of New York Liberty Street Economics Blog, June 2013

I Want My Money Now: The Highs and Lows of Payments in Real Time
With Parinitha Sastry
Federal Reserve Bank of New York Liberty Street Economics Blog, April 2013

Why Did U.S. Branches of Foreign Banks Borrow at the Discount Window during the Crisis?
With Linda Goldberg
Federal Reserve Bank of New York Liberty Street Economics Blog, April 2011

David Skeie's CVPDFThe views expressed in the papers listed on this page are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the position of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York or the Federal Reserve System.